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https://businesschampionawards.co.uk/

Tips to boss your application

Keen to get involved in the Business Champion Awards? Ready to showcase your company’s talent and be rewarded for your efforts to boost the economy?

GOOD! Here’s some essential tips for you to quickly read through on your lunch break and make sure your applications stands out above the rest.

Be financially savvy

Ensure your financials are on point and correct. Our judges know the ups and downs of being in business so don’t worry if your financials dipped – an honest chat about that period of time and how you kept on going is more likely going to impress compared to covering up a period of time and being found out for it later on down the line.

 Honesty is the best policy to becoming a Business Champion

Sticking with the honesty note, don’t be shy to tell us of what you’ve achieved – this is your time to shine. you should create  a bullet point list of your most important ‘wins’, putting them in the most impressive order and then working out which part of the application process they’re most relevant for. As long as you’re honest you’ll be ready to share and talk about.

Are you current and correct?

You may have made your website yourself, that’s no problem, however, do double check that the messaging is still current and not out-of-date.

Don’t neglect your champion story

Really research and delve into the award and category you’re applying for. For example, if you’ve really made a concerted effort for your team and business to become eco-friendly and sustainable then sharing the story of why you made that decision in the first place is a good place to start. Then tell the judges the processes that you’ve altered to achieve your goals. Your story is interesting – you might find it commonplace but to the judges it shows that you’re conscious and considered.

Be succinct

Remember that you’ve only got a certain amount of space on the application and on the day, if you’re fortunate enough to be short-listed, you will only have twenty minutes to present to the judging panel and twenty five minutes for a questions and answer session from them so not being precise is not going to work in your favour …

Winning an award

If you’re shortlisted and you are organising your presentation, try where possible to ensure that the Founder and leader of the company is involved in the presentation. The reality that many companies apply via their marketing staff is one that the judges are aware of, however, any extenuating circumstances aside, don’t forget that these are sought-after awards and the company who cares the most to ensure the CEO or Founder is involved in the presentation is definitely streets ahead of one that can’t be bothered to make time for it.

P is for preparation

If you are fortunate enough to be shortlisted as a finalist, turn up on time and be well prepared to present. Ensure that your documents are to hand and your tech is working well. Setting up at least a good 15 minutes beforehand will hopefully give you enough time to ensure this.

R is for research

Really read and research around the criteria that you’re being judged on. For example, if ethics counts for 20% of your total grade, tell us what decisions you’ve made for the every day good of your staff and culture, and the greater good for the population and planet.

Chat to the judges – they’re people too

Don’t ever just read from your powerpoint presentation, instead, use it to capture and inspire. For example, if you’re proud to tell us that you’ve installed environmentally friendly solar panelling on your new warehouse then show us with a decently shot image. Think of the presentation screen as a means to qualify and bring your story to life. If you are going to use a powerpoint display or screen share, then remember that everything should add to what you’re saying, not be the whole sum of it.

Channel the mindset of a champion

It’s your business, you’ve grown it, maybe lost sleepless nights over it and ultimately you’re still here today to tell us the story behind it. Remember that the judges want to hear it – they’re interested and ready to focus on you. This is not Dragons’ Den, this is a change to profile your business and its strengths and potentially be recognised and rewarded for it.